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DO RUSSIA’S SECRET WEAPONS INCLUDE INVISIBLE SUBMARINES, OR IS THAT A RUSSIAN BLUFF? HERE’S THE STORY OF THE DAY SWEDEN WAS INVADED BY A RUSSIAN WEAPON SO SECRET, IT DIDN’T EXIST

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By David O’Brien, Boston

The mainstream media (MSM) lie constantly.

Writers in the alternative media work hard to expose these lies as they appear each day. But there is only so much they can catch in real time. Sometimes, looking back at an old story can give you a better understanding of exactly what happened, especially since you can include events that occurred after the initial story disappeared from the headlines.

I did this for a story that took place in October of 2014, when Sweden’s military conducted a massive search for what they were convinced was a Russian submarine lurking in their territorial waters. The story was headline news for a week straight, and people who follow the news most likely remember it to this day.

Reuters [2] broke the story in the US on Saturday the 18th.

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They quoted the Swedish newspaper Svenska Dagbladet  (SvD), who, quoting anonymous sources,   [4]said [4]  [5]that [5]  [5] the sub hunt began when a radio transmission in Russian was picked up on an emergency frequency, along with encrypted radio traffic coming from Russia’s Kaliningrad territory. This was pretty convincing evidence that Russia did indeed have a sub in Swedish waters, and it sounded like it might be having some difficulty. The only issue with this story, though, is that when Rear Admiral Anders Grenstad, who at the time was Deputy Chief of Operations of the Swedish Navy, was   [6]asked [6]  [6]about it, he “rejected that they had [received] informationabout any emergency call in Russian”.
 
I only found this minor detail about the Swedish Navy rejecting the entire SvD storyline in a single report from   [7]CBS [7]. [7]
 
What was not reported at all in the US was that a week later, the Swedish newspaper Dagens Nyheterciting freedom of information requests and sources within the military,   [8]published [8]  [8] an   [9]article [9]  [9] saying that
neither of these events ever happened.
 
 Not only did the US media not report that the whole SvD storyline was a lie, they   [10]continued [10]  [10] to tell the lie after it was shown in the Swedish media to be a lie.
 
The Swedish military, on the day before the fabricated SvD  article was published,   [11]said [11]  [11] that the sub hunt started based on information from a  [12]credible [12]  [13]source [13] [13], which turned out to   [14]be [14]  [15]a [15]  [16]private [16]  [4]citizen [4]. [4] They would not even confirm [17]  [17]that the “information” they received was a submarine sighting! What could a private citizen say to a nation’s military that would initiate a   [18]3 million dollar [18]  [18] submarine hunt? I can’t think of anything other than a sighting of a Russian submarine. But there was no photo involved, so I guess they just took somebody’s word for it.
 
One tidbit of information the Swedish military gave out was that the “event” (I can’t call it a sighting) happened in   [19]Kanholmsfjärden [19]  [19] Bay. Strangely enough, the very next morning, some elderly Swedes were crossing a bridge at the edge of Kanholmsfjärden Bay and they   [20]saw a submarine [20]! [20] It turns out that at the base of the bridge is a resort called   [21]Djuronaset [21], [21] and they happen to own a submarine that had been retired from the Swedish Navy, and they use it to   [22]give rides [22]  [22] to   [23]tourists [23]. [23] 
 
The elderly Swedes saw the tourist sub. 
 
Here is where the home of the tourist sub is located relative to where the “event” occurred that started the whole submarine hunt:
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The “event” that started the sub hunt occurred very close to where the tourist sub operates. Many people in Sweden assumed the entire submarine hunt was based on a sighting of the tourist sub.
 
Let’s talk about other submarine sightings that occurred during the sub hunt. There were   [25]5 of these [25]  [25](outof over  [14]250 total [14]) [14] that the Swedish military deemed “credible”. The first was the one that started the submarine hunt, which we discussed.
 
The second sighting was made by a fisherman, and also did not involve a photo. It was reported by a local [26]  [27]newspaper [27], [27] but nowhere else. The reason for this is likely that the fisherman is a   [28]convicted [28]  [28]pedophile [29]. [29] I guess they didn’t want to parade him around in the media.
 
The third sighting included a photo!!  [30]Here [30]  [30]it is:
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This, as it turns out, is the best evidence ever produced by this propaganda masterpiece. It shows nothing, and is nonsense. This is known as the “Ornö” image.
 
The  [32]fourth [32]  [33]and [33]  [34]fifth [34]  [34]“credible” sightings involved no photos, and went relatively unreported.
 
There were 250 submarine sightings during the submarine hunt, and the photo above is the only one that was taken. You probably didn’t realize that Sweden is a poor country where nobody has cameras, or telephones with cameras.
 
A week after the sub hunt officially ended, there was another   [35]submarine [35]  [36]sighting [36]  [36] which was   [37]made [37]  [37]by a retired Swedish naval officer. Luckily, he is a rare Swede who has a camera, and he took a picture of the sub. The photo was deemed by the Swedish media to be a much better quality image than the “blurry and difficult to decipher” Ornö image.   [38]Here [38]  [38]it is:
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The Swedish military  [40]investigated [40]  [40]this sighting for 6 months, and decided that the dot you see in the photo was a Swedish  [41]fishing [41]  [42]boat [42]  [42]named the Time Bandit. I looked up this boat  [43]online [43]. [43] Here it is:
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The photo taken by the retired Swedish naval officer was a much better quality image than the Ornö image, and the Ornö image was a much better quality image than whatever started the submarine hunt, because the Ornö image was at least an image, whereas whatever started the submarine hunt did not involve any image.